Connect with us

Social Media

WHO WAS RECY TAYLOR? OPRAH MENTIONS ALABAMA WOMAN IN GOLDEN GLOBES SPEECH

Published

on

Recy Taylor was an African American woman from Abbeville, Alabama who was blindfolded, abducted and raped on her way home from a church service in 1944 by six white men when she was 24 years old.

The rape was extensively covered in the black press at the time and a catalyst for the civil rights movement.  The N.A.A.C.P. sent a young activist from its Montgomery, Ala., chapter named Rosa Parks to investigate. Taylor’s attackers were never prosecuted.

According to The New York Times, the all-white, all-male grand juries refused to indict the men despite one of them confessing, which was the case with most incidents involving black victims during the Jim Crow era in the South.

The Alabama Legislature passed a resolution apologizing to Taylor in 2011. On Jan. 7, 2018, Taylor was recognized by Oprah Winfrey at the Golden Globes as an inspiration and someone “you should know.”

“For too long, women have not been heard or believed if they dare speak the truth to the power of those men,” Winfrey said. “But their time is up. Their time is up.”

In her speech, Winfrey drew distinctions between the climate Taylor lived in and the climate today—using Taylor’s story as an example of why change is necessary.

“She lived, as we all have lived, too many years in a culture broken by the brutally powerful men,” she said.

Watch the official trailer from documentary on the rape of Recy Taylor below:

Video Courtesy of WideHouse

The Rape of Recy Taylor mentioned earlier in this report, follows the true story of a young woman who was gang-raped by six white males in 1944 Alabama while walking home from church. They threatened to kill her if she spoke up.  Despite the life-threatening risk posed to any black person who stood up for their rights in the Jim Crow south, Taylor did not hesitate to seek justice immediately.

During her iconic Golden Globes speech, Oprah Winfrey highlighted Recy Taylor’s story and said she was a woman “you should know.”  (AP Photo/Phelan M. Ebenhack, File)

It wasn’t until historian Danielle L. McGuire published the book “At the Dark End of the Street: Black Women, Rape, and Resistance — a New History of the Civil Rights Movement from Rosa Parks to the Rise of Black Power” in 2010 that the case gained the attention it deserved.

In 2011, the Alabama Legislature called the state’s failure to prosecute Taylor’s attackers “morally abhorrent and repugnant,” the Times reported.

Though systemic oppression denied Recy justice and minimized her to the margins of civil rights history, women in entertainment are now using their platforms to try and rectify that. Oprah’s speech seemed to be partially inspired by Buirski’s film, which not only preserved Recy’s story in her own words but spoke to the larger tradition of how black women have always lead the charge on human rights issues in this country despite facing disproportionate risks for doing so.

From the historic Montgomery Bus Boycott to women of color heading the Black Lives Matter movement and Anita Hill pioneering the legal battle against sexual harassment in the workplace, society’s path forward hinges on black women’s leadership.

Taylor died on December 28, 2017, in a nursing home in Abbeville, Ala., just before her 98th birthday. Her brother said Taylor’s death was sudden, and she had been in good spirits just the day before.

@LeNoraMillen    01-08-18

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

You must be logged in to post a comment Login

Leave a Reply

Lifestyle

Tire Safety Tips for Winter When Temperatures Drop

Published

on

The same temperature you can begin to see your breath at 45 F—is also when the all-season tires on your car can start to lose traction and grip.

As temperatures drop, drivers should remember that if you can see your breath, you should think about winter tires. Whether you’re planning a cross-country trek or simply driving to and from work daily, exposing your vehicle’s tires to colder weather could lead to potential trouble on the road.

Snow and ice may be fun to play in, but they make for dangerous driving conditions. Winter tires are built for cold-weather conditions and deliver improved starting, stopping and steering control in temperatures 45 F and below. The difference is the tread compound of winter tires, which stays soft and pliable in colder temperatures for superior traction. Add the tread design of winter tires with thousands of extra gripping edges and you get as much as a 25-50 percent increase in traction over all-season tires.

To help stay safe on the road this winter, the experts on tires and winter driving recommend following these four tire safety tips:

  • Get ready now. It is important to replace all four of your vehicle’s all-season tires with winter tires if you regularly drive in temperatures 45 F or below, snow or no snow. Winter tires are made of a softer rubber that allows the tires to stay pliable and maintain better contact with the road through winter weather conditions.
  • Don’t forget the wheels. Having a set of wheels specifically for your winter tires can save you money in the long run. Pairing a separate set of wheels with your winter tires can eliminate certain changeover costs and save your everyday wheels from the wear and tear brought on by ice, slush, snow, and salt during the winter months.
  • Know your numbers. Check your tire pressure at least once a month to make sure tires are at the appropriate inflation level. Temperature changes affect tire pressure – for every 10 degrees of temperature change, tire air pressure changes 1 pound per square inch. Low tire pressure can lead to decreased steering and braking control, poor gas mileage, excessive tire wear and the possibility of tire failure. Also, don’t forget to check your spare tire.
  • Rotate, rotate, rotate. To help increase tread life and smooth out your ride, rotate your tires every 6,000 miles or sooner if irregular or uneven wear develops.

Your safety is important, that’s why drivers should make it a point to beat the rush by getting winter ready before the first snowstorm or cold streak of the season hits.

Photo: Getty Images

Source: Discount Tire

 

@LeNoraMillen        01-19-18

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Continue Reading

Health Care

Medicare Takes Aim at Medical Identity Theft: Protecting Seniors From Fraud

Published

on

Criminals are increasingly targeting people age 65 or older for personal identity theft. In 2014 alone, there were 2.6 million such incidents among seniors, according to the Department of Justice.

A growing offshoot of identity theft is healthcare fraud, which can result when someone unlawfully uses another person’s Medicare number. Medical identity theft can lead to inaccuracies in medical records, which in turn can result in delayed care, denied services and costly false claims.

That’s why Medicare works with the Department of Justice, taking aim squarely at would-be thieves. In the largest law enforcement action against criminals fraudulently targeting the Medicare, Medicaid and Tricare programs, 412 people around the country, including 115 doctors, nurses and other licensed medical professionals, were charged in 2017 with bilking U.S. taxpayers out of $1.3 billion.

New Medicare Card for 2018. (Video Courtesy of YouTube)

The next big fraud-fighting push is well underway — and its focus is protecting the personal information of senior citizens by removing their Social Security numbers from Medicare cards.

People with Medicare don’t need to take any action to get a new Medicare card. Beginning in April 2018, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will mail out newly designed Medicare cards to the 58 million Americans with Medicare. The cards will have a new number that will be unique for each card recipient. This will help protect personal identity and prevent fraud because identity thieves can’t bill Medicare without a valid Medicare number. To help with a seamless transition to the new cards, providers will be able to use secure lookup tools that will support quick access to the new card numbers when needed.

Healthcare fraud drives up costs for everyone, but healthcare consumers can be an effective first line of defense against fraud. Follow these tips to help protect yourself:

Do

  • Treat your Medicare number like a credit card.
  • When the new card comes in the mail next year, destroy your old card and make sure you bring your new one to your doctors’ appointments.
  • Be suspicious of anyone offering early bird discounts, limited time offers or encouraging you to act now for the best deal. That’s an indicator of potential fraud because Medicare plans are forbidden from offering incentives.
  • Be skeptical of free gifts, free medical services, discount packages or any offer that sounds too good to be true.
  • Only give your Medicare number to doctors, insurers acting on your behalf or trusted people in the community who work with Medicare, like your State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP).
  • Report suspected instances of fraud.
  • Check your Medicare statements to make sure the charges are accurate.

Don’t

  • Don’t share your Medicare number or other personal information with anyone who contacts you by telephone, email or approaches you in person, unless you’ve given them permission in advance. Medicare will never contact you uninvited and request your Medicare number or other personal information.
  • Don’t let anyone borrow or pay to use your Medicare number.
  • Don’t allow anyone, except your doctor or other Medicare providers, to review your medical records or recommend services.
  • Don’t let anyone persuade you to see a doctor for care or services you don’t need.
  • Don’t accept medical supplies from a door-to-door salesman.

Learn more about how you can fight Medicare fraud at Medicare.gov/fraud, or call 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227). You can also visit a local SHIP counselor, who can provide free, one-on-one, non-biased Medicare assistance.

With a common sense approach to protecting health information, senior citizens can be effective partners in fighting Medicare fraud.

 

Source: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

@LeNoraMillen       01-19-18

 

 

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Continue Reading

Politics

Trump Children’s Health Insurance Tweet Contradicts White House Administration

Published

on

Washington (CNN) President Donald Trump contradicted his own administration on Thursday when he tweeted that funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program  (CHIP) should not be included in a short-term plan to fund the government.

Trump’s tweet sent on Thursday morning, seemingly undercut the “Stopgap Spending Bill,” leaving many confused at what could be construed as an “Anti-Chip” tweet.

Read more here

@LeNoraMillen     01-18-18

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Continue Reading

Subscribe to Exposure Magazine Daily News

Enter your email address to subscribe to our daily news and receive news updates via email.

Join 37,456 other subscribers

Milwaukee
30°
broken clouds
humidity: 68%
wind: 13mph SW
H 40 • L 37
41°
Sat
37°
Sun
45°
Mon
45°
Tue
Weather from OpenWeatherMap

Contact

Map for INFO@RLASSC.COM Milwaukee Wisconsin 53202 United States

Trending