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Roy Moore: America Was ‘Great’ During ‘Slavery’

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Roy Moore, the embattled Alabama Senate candidate under fire for alleged sexual misconduct with teenage girls when he was in his 30s, believes America was a better place at a time when slavery was still legal.

Republican candidate for U.S. Senate Judge Roy Moore speaks during a campaign event in Fairhope, Alabama, U.S., December 5, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachma

At a campaign event earlier this year, an audience member asked Moore for his opinion on when the last time America was “great.”

Moore responded: “I think it was great at the time when families were united—even though we had slavery—they cared for one another…Our families were strong; our country had a direction.”

The audience member asking the question was among the few African-Americans in attendance at the rally, according to a Los Angeles Times report.

Though many will draw their own conclusions about Moore’s statement, the implication could be construed by some people that perhaps Moore is willing to overlook the enslavement of people as long as families are “united.”

From a historical context, most who frown upon the “enslavement” of people could easily point to the hypocrisy of Moore using “slavery” as a premise for uniting families.

Family separation through sale was a constant threat.  Enslaved people lived with the perpetual possibility of separation through the sale of one or more family members.  Slaveowners’ wealth was largely in the people they owned, therefore, they frequently “sold or purchased” people as finances warranted.

Moore’s remarks featured in an article from the Times in September, resurfaced Thursday in a viral tweet from Eric Columbus, a former Obama administration official.

“Can’t make this up—Roy Moore said in September that the last time America was great was when we had slavery,” Columbus tweeted…

Moore’s comments at the rally aligns with President Donald Trump’s slogan, “Make America Great Again,” a rallying cry to incite his base.

Despite widespread condemnation amid the damning allegations the Senate candidate faces—Trump has endorsed Moore via Twitter refusing to acknowledge the Mounting allegations of Moore.  Trump also reportedly said “Go get ‘em, Roy!” during a recent phone call with the candidate.

The president’s refusal to call out Moore for the allegations point to the sexual harassment allegations lodged against then-candidate Trump by at least 16 women who accused Trump of sexually harassing them during his campaign.  Adding more fuel to the allegations, the “Access Hollywood” tape hanging over Trump’s head like a dark cloud still haunts President Trump who has since refuted tape as a conspiracy theory.

Trump’s denial of his role in the tape, prompted the former “Access Hollywood” host Billy Bush to call him out.  “He said it. Grab ’em by the p___y. Of course, he said it. And we laughed along, without a single doubt that this was hypothetical hot air from America’s highest-rated bloviator,” Bush wrote in his New York Times op-ed.

A recent Big League-Gravis poll gave Moore’s Democratic opponent, Doug Jones (who isn’t accused of sexually assaulting teenage girls), a slight edge over the Republican. The poll of 1,276 likely voters showed Jones leading Moore 48 percent to 44 percent. The election is on December 12.

On December 4, Trump tweeted, “Putting Pelosi/Schumer Liberal Puppet Jones into office in Alabama would hurt our great Republican Agenda of low on taxes, tough on crime, strong on military and borders…& so much more. Look at your 401-k’s since Election. Highest Stock Market EVER! Jobs are roaring back!” Indeed, Trump apparently believes a man who was reportedly banned from an Alabama mall for harassing teenage girls would be “tough on crime” and is urging voters to support him.

Beyond his views on slavery and allegations of sexual misconduct, Moore also has referred to Native Americans as “reds and yellows,” has questioned former President Barack Obama’s place of birth (following Trump’s example) and once suggested Muslims should not be allowed to serve in Congress. In spite of all this, Moore still seems to have at shot of becoming a United States senator.

Moore’s comments are not only insensitive, they also speak to how detached he seemingly is from the ravages of slavery, America’s original sin.

Moore has shown time and time again, in his remarks insensitivity to certain groups.  He’s referred t to Native Americans and Asian Americans as “reds and yellows.”   The controversial candidate compared the Supreme Court decision legalizing same-sex marriage to the decision that effectively denied black people citizenship.  Moore has also questioned whether former President Barack Obama was born in the US. And he previously argued that Muslims should not be allowed to serve in Congress.

 

LeNora Millen        12-08-17

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Health Care

Medicare Takes Aim at Medical Identity Theft: Protecting Seniors From Fraud

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Criminals are increasingly targeting people age 65 or older for personal identity theft. In 2014 alone, there were 2.6 million such incidents among seniors, according to the Department of Justice.

A growing offshoot of identity theft is healthcare fraud, which can result when someone unlawfully uses another person’s Medicare number. Medical identity theft can lead to inaccuracies in medical records, which in turn can result in delayed care, denied services and costly false claims.

That’s why Medicare works with the Department of Justice, taking aim squarely at would-be thieves. In the largest law enforcement action against criminals fraudulently targeting the Medicare, Medicaid and Tricare programs, 412 people around the country, including 115 doctors, nurses and other licensed medical professionals, were charged in 2017 with bilking U.S. taxpayers out of $1.3 billion.

New Medicare Card for 2018. (Video Courtesy of YouTube)

The next big fraud-fighting push is well underway — and its focus is protecting the personal information of senior citizens by removing their Social Security numbers from Medicare cards.

People with Medicare don’t need to take any action to get a new Medicare card. Beginning in April 2018, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will mail out newly designed Medicare cards to the 58 million Americans with Medicare. The cards will have a new number that will be unique for each card recipient. This will help protect personal identity and prevent fraud because identity thieves can’t bill Medicare without a valid Medicare number. To help with a seamless transition to the new cards, providers will be able to use secure lookup tools that will support quick access to the new card numbers when needed.

Healthcare fraud drives up costs for everyone, but healthcare consumers can be an effective first line of defense against fraud. Follow these tips to help protect yourself:

Do

  • Treat your Medicare number like a credit card.
  • When the new card comes in the mail next year, destroy your old card and make sure you bring your new one to your doctors’ appointments.
  • Be suspicious of anyone offering early bird discounts, limited time offers or encouraging you to act now for the best deal. That’s an indicator of potential fraud because Medicare plans are forbidden from offering incentives.
  • Be skeptical of free gifts, free medical services, discount packages or any offer that sounds too good to be true.
  • Only give your Medicare number to doctors, insurers acting on your behalf or trusted people in the community who work with Medicare, like your State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP).
  • Report suspected instances of fraud.
  • Check your Medicare statements to make sure the charges are accurate.

Don’t

  • Don’t share your Medicare number or other personal information with anyone who contacts you by telephone, email or approaches you in person, unless you’ve given them permission in advance. Medicare will never contact you uninvited and request your Medicare number or other personal information.
  • Don’t let anyone borrow or pay to use your Medicare number.
  • Don’t allow anyone, except your doctor or other Medicare providers, to review your medical records or recommend services.
  • Don’t let anyone persuade you to see a doctor for care or services you don’t need.
  • Don’t accept medical supplies from a door-to-door salesman.

Learn more about how you can fight Medicare fraud at Medicare.gov/fraud, or call 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227). You can also visit a local SHIP counselor, who can provide free, one-on-one, non-biased Medicare assistance.

With a common sense approach to protecting health information, senior citizens can be effective partners in fighting Medicare fraud.

 

Source: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

@LeNoraMillen       01-19-18

 

 

 

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Politics

Trump Children’s Health Insurance Tweet Contradicts White House Administration

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Washington (CNN) President Donald Trump contradicted his own administration on Thursday when he tweeted that funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program  (CHIP) should not be included in a short-term plan to fund the government.

Trump’s tweet sent on Thursday morning, seemingly undercut the “Stopgap Spending Bill,” leaving many confused at what could be construed as an “Anti-Chip” tweet.

Read more here

@LeNoraMillen     01-18-18

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Politics

What If a Government Shutdown Occurs? Five Things to Know

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The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base BARRIE BARBER/STAFF

The federal government faces a partial federal shutdown threat Friday without a $1.1 trillion appropriations spending budget or a temporary stopgap spending measure in place.

Here’s what could happen in the Miami Valley if a shutdown occurs:

FURLOUGHS: A Wright-Patterson Air Force Base spokesman said this week the base had not received guidance on what actions to take. But the last time a federal government shutdown occurred in 2013, thousands of Wright-Patterson civilian employees were furloughed temporarily. Among those exempted were police, fire, medical and airfield operations. Military service members remained on the job.

MUSEUM: The region’s biggest tourist attraction, the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force, would close until a funding deal is reached, according to a spokesman.

MAIL SERVICE: The U.S. Postal Service, which is considered self-funded, would continue operations, including home delivery and post offices, would stay open, a spokesman said.

DAYTON VA: The Department of Veterans Affairs medical facilities would remain open. The VA operates on a two-year budget cycle, exempting the department from the latest funding skirmish in Washington.

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE: NPS sites in the Dayton region closed during the last shutdown in 2013. An NPS directive issued in September 2017, said parks would close if a lapse in federal government appropriations occurs.

Source: Dayton Daily News

@LeNoraMillen    01-18-18

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