Connect with us

Health Care

Rev. Jesse Jackson discloses Parkinson’s disease diagnosis



U.S. civil rights leader the Reverend Jesse Jackson disclosed Friday he has Parkinson’s disease, a progressive neurological condition that affects body movement.

In a  letter to supporters, the 76-year-old civil rights icon said family and friends noticed a change in him about three years ago and he could no longer ignore symptoms.

He says the diagnosis isn’t a sign to stop working but a “signal” to make “lifestyle changes” to slow progression of the chronic neurological disorder that causes movement difficulties.

“Recognition of the effects of this disease on me has been painful, and I have been slow to grasp the gravity of it,” he said. “For me, a Parkinson’s diagnosis is not a stop sign but rather a signal that I must make lifestyle changes and dedicate myself to physical therapy in hopes of slowing the disease’s progression.”

Jackson has been a leader of the U.S. civil rights movement since the mid-1960s and was with Martin Luther King when he was assassinated in Memphis, Tennessee, in 1968.

He twice sought the Democratic presidential nomination and has acted as an emissary to secure the release of Americans held abroad.

Parkinson’s disease occurs when certain nerve cells break down and reduce the amount of the chemical, dopamine, that sends signals to the part of the brain that controls movement, according to But the disease progresses slowly, and treatments can slow it down even more, it said.

Jackson said he planned to advocate to find a cure for the disease, which he said “bested my father,” strikes 60,000 Americans a year and afflicts 7 to 10 million people worldwide. He also said he is writing his memoir.

“I will continue to try to instill hope in the hopeless, expand our democracy to the disenfranchised and free innocent prisoners around the world,” he said.

Read the letter below:

Dear Friends and Supporters,

 On July 17, 1960, I was arrested, along with seven other college students, for advocating for the right to use a public library in my hometown of Greenville, S.C. I remember it like it was yesterday, for that day changed my life forever. From that experience, I lost my fear of being jailed for a righteous cause. I went on to meet Dr. King and dedicate my heart and soul to the fight for justice, equality, and equal access. In the tradition of the Apostle Paul, I have offered myself – my mind, body and soul – as a living sacrifice.

Throughout my career of service, God has kept me in the embrace of his loving arms, and protected me and my family from dangers, seen and unseen. Now in the latter years of my life, at 76 years old, I find it increasingly difficult to perform routine tasks, and getting around is more of a challenge. My family and I began to notice changes about three years ago. For a while, I resisted interrupting my work to visit a doctor. But as my daily physical struggles intensified I could no longer ignore the symptoms, so I acquiesced.

After a battery of tests, my physicians identified the issue as Parkinson’s disease, a disease that bested my father.

Recognition of the effects of this disease on me has been painful, and I have been slow to grasp the gravity of it. For me, a Parkinson’s diagnosis is not a stop sign but rather a signal that I must make lifestyle changes and dedicate myself to physical therapy in hopes of slowing the disease’s progression.

I am far from alone. God continues to give me new opportunities to serve. This diagnosis is personal but it is more than that. It is an opportunity for me to use my voice to help in finding a cure for a disease that afflicts 7 to 10 million worldwide. Some 60,000 Americans are diagnosed with Parkinson’s every year.

I will continue to try to instill hope in the hopeless, expand our democracy to the disenfranchised and free innocent prisoners around the world. I’m also spending some time working on my memoir so I can share with others the lessons I have learned in my life of public service. I steadfastly affirm that I would rather wear out than rust out.

I want to thank my family and friends who continue to care for me and support me. I will need your prayers and graceful understanding as I undertake this new challenge. As we continue in the struggle for human rights, remember that God will see us through, even in our midnight moments.



Rev. Jesse L. Jackson, Sr.


By LeNora Millen                 11-17-17

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Continue Reading
Click to comment

You must be logged in to post a comment Login

Leave a Reply


Question Who You Are and Discover Your Purpose by Rose G. Shelton



From a kid, I was a wondering energy.  Confused about the contradictions in life I saw in the experiences of the beings around me.  The adults, politicians, community leaders, elders and religious heads that graced pulpits, stages and the television waves spoke one thing and lived lives opposing. Friends and neighbors holding onto religious ideologies and at the bottom of the food chain hoping for the truth to one day prove itself to be real and lift them up from the struggles of life.  Never seeing it happen, wishing for it in the bye and bye. And yet, these flawed philosophies were expected to inform me of my own belief system about me. I would find myself questioning humanity, religion, life itself.  The answers to my many questions, I could not find in the divergence of life playing out before my young eyes.  The antagonistic existence and inhumane norms I did not see change much throughout my life. 

So I allowed my mind to give me answers that made more sense than those given to me from the outside. When I say my mind, I mean my spirit.  Also known as God or the Universe.  He nor I care what it is called.  Names are limiting and worthless in context. I will leave the fight of naming to those seeking to be right in the fight of inconsistency. 

I studied this humanity I was a part.  Despite its established hierarchy, I was able to see greatness in the weak and weakness in the great.  I found love in those identified as unlovable and judgment in those considered full of love.  This confusion of this upside-down world led me to study further.  However, the hate and anger toward those that dared be different made me study in silence and not speak of what I assessed.  I did not believe my research findings as a child, would be pleasing to peers or adults alike.  The search outside of my mind for answers and lucidity ceased the older I got and the internal conversation intensified.  This is where I found freedom and my purpose. Inside of me.   No one was able to give it to me. No one was able to discover it for me. No one was able to touch it, no one but me.

I had a hard time accepting my eccentricity in a world that honored compliance and traditionalism.  I held that celebrating originality was not standard.  When discovered, there is always one looking for a way to destroy it in public view and quash all others fire. So, like many of you, I hid it and tried to live a conformed and normal life.  Whatever normal is.   The problem was when you are an idiosyncratic aware of your peculiar individuality; you become as contradictory and complex as everyone else around you.  You become what you are fearful of becoming.  Both you and the world; hiding, conforming, confused. Therefore, not living in authenticity.  Trapped in relationships with illustrious invalidity. 

I realized that I, as others, became defined by experiences, culture, race, ethnicity, religion, gender, tradition and society.  I decided to forsake the game life handed to me and walk in my own identity.  I no longer desired humanities conscious effort to ignore itself and redefine me.  I did not want religion, culture, society, ideology and the like to define, conform or inform me.  I let go.  I instead questioned every part of me and dug through the rubble of my identity to find myself.

There is an intrinsic truth we all hold waiting to be uncovered.  If we allow it to rise to the top, our purpose will become obvious.  Sometimes, your purpose is as simple as I am the one that wipes the eyes of the blind. Maybe you help the lame to walk.  Possibly you are the one that questions man’s intention and action with discerning inquiring.  Despite this likelihood, that unique insatiable vibration that we hold within is killed to be accepted by the blind, the lame and the unquestioned.  While the world remains in constant wanting, waiting for us to arise and shine in the full knowing of who we are.    We fail them because we neglect to ask the question that I ask you to answer today – Man, who are you?

To help you answer this question, I will tell you one of the ways I allowed the answer to come to me.  I close my eyes and stand in the darkness of my mind.  In this secret place of my mind, I have no religion, no family, no country, no ideology.  There is nothing. I am nothing definable.  I am vibration, energy, a movement in the universe that holds an intention that is diminished by words.  Yet, I can detect my place in this vastness.  I examine my intrinsic nature that has remained constant and true despite experiences and life itself.  I apprehend that I am a questioner that questions all things, and yet, I am the holder of answers.  I question because questioning brings me answers that faith cannot clarify or quantify. 

Since I have recognized and accepted this concept of myself, my life has felt freer and has more value.  I am solid in who I am and my purpose.  We all have our place and part to play. Without you playing your part, I and others, cannot fully achieve on our path.  We benefit from your greatness. 

With that said, what are the 8 questions to ask yourself right now to help discover who you are and gain clarity of your purpose.

1.     What informs your definition of who you are? 

2.     Are you defined by life’s stories, traumas, tragedy, money, career, family, religion, race, ethnicity or something intangible? 

3.     Who do you say you are, what is your 15 second elevator pitch of you?

4.     Is your speech about what you do, what you look like or something deeper?

5.     What fear keeps you from being uniquely you? 

6.     What comfort is there in conformity that you believe is not present in arising and shinning as the diamond that you are?

7.     If you could do anything in life for free and money was not an issue, what would it be?

8.     What do you find yourself doing in every area of your life naturally?




Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Continue Reading

Health Care

VisitPay has an Exclusive Agreement with JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A.



This Agreement will allow VisitPay to offer Healthcare Providers receivables Financing


VisitPay has an Exclusive Agreement with JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A

Did you know that VisitPay is the First and Only Platform for Patient Financial Health?

VisitPay is the culmination of seven years learning and Development .

VisitPay’s Headquarter is located in Boise, Idaho, where it has assembled a powerful team focused on predictive analytics, user-driven software design and consumer finance.

It’s a proprietary Cloud-based Platform that enables Health Systems to dramatically increase the amount paid on patient balances.

VisitPay has an Exclusive Agreement with JPMorgan

This Platform makes it possible for patients to finally exercise control over their Financial Health.

VisitPay signed an Exclusive Agreement with JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. in connection with the bank’s plan to extend recourse financing to VisitPay’s new Balance Transfer Program, which will provide wholesale funding to Healthcare Providers.

The Exclusive Agreement with JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A comes as the cost of care is increasingly shifted to patients.

Nearly 40% of healthcare consumers privately purchased a high-deductible health plan in 2016, up from 26% in 2011, according to the National Center for Health Statistics.

With the launch of the Balance Transfer Program, VisitPay now offers Providers a fully automated and economically sustainable approach to financing patient receivables.

St. Luke’s Health System in Boise, a long standing VisitPay Client, is among the Innovation Partners shaping the Program.

“VisitPay has empowered us to deliver a patient financial experience as exceptional as our clinical experiences,”said Jeff Taylor, St. Luke’s Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer. “The Agreement JPMorgan and VisitPay is a significant next step in terms of giving both patients and health systems control over their financial security.”


VisitPay has an Exclusive Agreement with JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A,

The Program minimizes days in accounts receivable and improves liquidity metrics, while seamlessly maintaining VisitPay’s provider branded Online Experience for patients.

“Managing long-term patient debt is not a core competence for most providers.”said Kent Ivanoff, VisitPay CEO and Co-Founder.

“It distracts them from fulfilling their core mission of delivering outstanding patient outcomes.The proposed financing will allow Providers to augment the unmatched billing experience created by VisitPay with a fully automated, low-cost financing solution.”

The New Balance Transfer Program will extend credit to Healthcare Systems as they manage the growth of patient’s debt associated with high deductible health plans.

VisitPay’s Platform already offers patients unprecedented transparency, choice and control in managing their health bills, thereby dramatically improving the patient experience, driving yield and reducing bad dept expenses.

More information about VisitPay can be found at

Follow Xiomara Margie Overman, Business Editor for new Articles published for Exposure Magazine

Margie Overman is Business Expert and Business Editor for Exposure Magazine

Visit her Social Media Links to stay informed about new articles published each week On Facebook  Twitter   Instragram

Sign Up Here for Weekly New Articles Publication Updates about Business and Entrepreneurship

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Continue Reading

Health Care

Medicare Takes Aim at Medical Identity Theft: Protecting Seniors From Fraud



Criminals are increasingly targeting people age 65 or older for personal identity theft. In 2014 alone, there were 2.6 million such incidents among seniors, according to the Department of Justice.

A growing offshoot of identity theft is healthcare fraud, which can result when someone unlawfully uses another person’s Medicare number. Medical identity theft can lead to inaccuracies in medical records, which in turn can result in delayed care, denied services and costly false claims.

That’s why Medicare works with the Department of Justice, taking aim squarely at would-be thieves. In the largest law enforcement action against criminals fraudulently targeting the Medicare, Medicaid and Tricare programs, 412 people around the country, including 115 doctors, nurses and other licensed medical professionals, were charged in 2017 with bilking U.S. taxpayers out of $1.3 billion.

New Medicare Card for 2018. (Video Courtesy of YouTube)

The next big fraud-fighting push is well underway — and its focus is protecting the personal information of senior citizens by removing their Social Security numbers from Medicare cards.

People with Medicare don’t need to take any action to get a new Medicare card. Beginning in April 2018, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will mail out newly designed Medicare cards to the 58 million Americans with Medicare. The cards will have a new number that will be unique for each card recipient. This will help protect personal identity and prevent fraud because identity thieves can’t bill Medicare without a valid Medicare number. To help with a seamless transition to the new cards, providers will be able to use secure lookup tools that will support quick access to the new card numbers when needed.

Healthcare fraud drives up costs for everyone, but healthcare consumers can be an effective first line of defense against fraud. Follow these tips to help protect yourself:


  • Treat your Medicare number like a credit card.
  • When the new card comes in the mail next year, destroy your old card and make sure you bring your new one to your doctors’ appointments.
  • Be suspicious of anyone offering early bird discounts, limited time offers or encouraging you to act now for the best deal. That’s an indicator of potential fraud because Medicare plans are forbidden from offering incentives.
  • Be skeptical of free gifts, free medical services, discount packages or any offer that sounds too good to be true.
  • Only give your Medicare number to doctors, insurers acting on your behalf or trusted people in the community who work with Medicare, like your State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP).
  • Report suspected instances of fraud.
  • Check your Medicare statements to make sure the charges are accurate.


  • Don’t share your Medicare number or other personal information with anyone who contacts you by telephone, email or approaches you in person, unless you’ve given them permission in advance. Medicare will never contact you uninvited and request your Medicare number or other personal information.
  • Don’t let anyone borrow or pay to use your Medicare number.
  • Don’t allow anyone, except your doctor or other Medicare providers, to review your medical records or recommend services.
  • Don’t let anyone persuade you to see a doctor for care or services you don’t need.
  • Don’t accept medical supplies from a door-to-door salesman.

Learn more about how you can fight Medicare fraud at, or call 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227). You can also visit a local SHIP counselor, who can provide free, one-on-one, non-biased Medicare assistance.

With a common sense approach to protecting health information, senior citizens can be effective partners in fighting Medicare fraud.


Source: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

@LeNoraMillen       01-19-18




Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Continue Reading

Subscribe to Exposure Magazine Daily News

Join 37,328 other subscribers

clear sky
humidity: 69%
wind: 3mph NW
H 35 • L 32
Weather from OpenWeatherMap
clear sky
humidity: 85%
wind: 3mph N
H 17 • L 14
Weather from OpenWeatherMap

Say What?