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What defines a game changer?

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A game changer is someone who sees a problem and finds a solution. See problematic people will always find what’s wrong, they seem to always look at what’s wrong rather than what’s right.

Problematic people stay stuck in their own way– of making change because they– fear change.

Game Changers are Solution orientated people– these are individuals who will look at a problem and find a solution– they come prepared for challenges and they don’t back down. They stand for something a fall for nothing.

Game Changers have the ability to change the climax, temperature, and environment for the greater good.

Understanding it is our moral obligation to serve rather than to be served. ‪#‎GameChanger‬‪#‎ExposureMagazine‬ ‪#‎MKEVIBE‬ ‪#‎RothandLawrence‬‪#‎UrbanWallStreetJournalNewspaper‬ moving to change the game.

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Amazon Reveals ‘20 Cities’ That Could Be The Home Of Its Next Headquarters

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Amazon has revealed 20 cities that could be the next home of its second North American headquarters, dubbed HQ2.

The candidates, selected out of 238 applicants, will move to the next round of Amazon’s selection process, the company said Thursday. Amazon will make a final decision on the site of its next headquarters this year.

The list of candidates includes Atlanta, Austin, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Denver, Washington, DC, and Columbus, Ohio.

Amazon said it will work with each city to “dive deeper into their proposals, request additional information, and evaluate the feasibility of a future partnership that can accommodate the company’s hiring plans as well as benefit its employees and the local community.”

Amazon has promised a $5 billion investment and up to 50,000 high-paying jobs to the city that wins its selection process.

“Getting from 238 to 20 was very tough – all the proposals showed tremendous enthusiasm and creativity,” said Holly Sullivan, head of public policy for Amazon. “Through this process, we learned about many new communities across North America that we will consider as locations for future infrastructure investment and job creation.”

Here are all the potential candidates:

  • Atlanta, GA
  • Austin, TX
  • Boston, MA
  • Chicago, IL
  • Columbus, OH
  • Dallas, TX
  • Denver, CO
  • Indianapolis, IN
  • Los Angeles, CA
  • Miami, FL
  • Montgomery County, MD
  • Nashville, TN
  • Newark, NJ
  • New York City, NY
  • Northern Virginia, VA
  • Philadelphia, PA
  • Pittsburgh, PA
  • Raleigh, NC
  • Toronto, ON
  • Washington DC

 

Source: Business Insider

@LeNoraMillen     01-18-18

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Lifestyle

Why Some African Americans are Moving to Africa

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Accra, Ghana – They have come from the big cities of San Francisco, Chicago, and New York. Thousands of them. And many refuse to return.

A new wave of African Americans is escaping the incessant racism and prejudice in the United States. From Senegal and Ghana to The Gambia, communities are emerging in defiance of conventional wisdom that Africa is a continent everyone is trying to leave.

It is estimated that between 3,000 and 5,000 African Americans live in Accra, the Ghanaian capital. They are teachers in small towns in the west or entrepreneurs in the capital and say they that even though living in Ghana is not always easy, they feel free and safe.

Take Muhammida el-Muhajir, a digital marketer from New York City, who left her job to move to Accra.

She says she moved because, despite her education and experience, she was always made to feel like a second-class citizen. Moving was an opportunity to fulfill her potential and avoid being targeted by racial violence.

She told Al Jazeera her story:

On life as a second-class citizen in the US…

“I grew up in Philadelphia and then New York. I went to Howard, which is a historically black university. I tell people that Ghana is like Howard in real life. It felt like a microcosm of the world. At university, they tell us the world isn’t black, but there are places where this is the real world. Howard prepares you for a world where black people are in charge, which is a completely different experience compared to people who  have gone to predominantly white universities.”

“I can’t say what’s happening in America today is any worse than what’s been happening at any other time.”  MUHAMMIDA EL-MUHAJIR

On her first trip to Africa…

“The first country I went to was Kenya. I was 15 and traveled with a group of kids. I was one of two black kids. I saw early that I could fit in and wasn’t an outsider. Suddenly it switched, I came from America where I was an outsider, but in Africa, I no longer felt like that. I did graduate school in Ghana in 2003 and went back to New York and then moved to Ghana in 2014.

“I have no connection to Ghana. Some people in my family did tests, and we found ties to Senegal and The Gambia, but I don’t think you can ever figure it out. No matter where you were sold or left the port, Senegal or Ghana, no one can be certain where you came from.”

“No matter where you were sold or left the port, Senegal or Ghana, no one can be certain where you came from.”  MUHAMMIDA EL-MUHAJIR

Market in Agbogbloshie, a district in Accra, Ghana’s capital [Thomas Imo/Photothek via Getty Images

On leaving New York for Accra…

“Even when you live in a place like New York as a black person, you’re always an outsider.

“You hear stories about the richest black people, like Oprah Winfrey, getting shut out of a store or Jay-Z not being allowed to buy [an apartment]. Those things happen. It doesn’t matter if you’re a celebrity, you’re a second-class citizen. This was the biggest issue for me.

“In America, you’re always trying to prove yourself; I don’t need to prove myself to anyone else’s standards here. I’m a champion, I ran track and went to university, and I like to win, so I refuse to be in a situation where I will never win.”

“You might not have electricity, but you won’t get killed by the police either.” 

MUHAMMIDA EL-MUHAJIR

On moving to Ghana…

“There are amenities that I am used to at home in New York – like parties, open bars and fashion, so when I realised I could do the same things in Africa as I could back in the US, I was sold. There is also a big street art festival here, and that was the difference from when I came [as a student]. I saw the things that I love at home here, so I decided that now is the time.”

On Ghanaian reactions…

“When Ghanaians find out that I live here, they’re usually confused about why I chose to live here as an American. There is definitely certain access and privilege being American here, but it’s great to finally cash in on that because it doesn’t mean anything in America.

“There are also plenty of privileged Ghanaians; if you take away race there’s a class system.”

Modern architecture in Ghana’s capital [Thomas Imo/Photothek via Getty Images

“In my documentary, I chose five people that I’ve met since I’ve been here and every one of them went to a black college in the US. It’s something that prepares you mentally to realize you aren’t a second-class citizen. Something like that can help you make a transition to living in Africa.

On the ‘Blaxit’ documentary…

“I made Blaxit because of this wave of African-Americans moving to Africa. This trend started to happen around the independence of African countries, but the new wave [comprises] people who come to places like this. This new group has certain access in America and comes here to have that lifestyle in Africa.

“Unbeknown to us, we’re living out the vision that [Ghanaian politician and revolutionary] Kwame Nkrumah set out for us, of this country being the gateway to Africa for the black diaspora.

“I don’t want people to think that Africa is this magic utopia where all your issues will go away. It’s just that some of the things you might face in America as a black person – you won’t have to suffer with those things here.

“You might not have electricity, but you won’t get killed by the police either.

“I want people to understand that they have options and alternatives. Most black people in America don’t know that these options exist; they think they have to suffer because there’s nowhere else to go. But no, there are other places.”

On the prospect of more African-Americans moving…

“I think more will come when they begin to see it as a viable alternative. But it’s not easy and it’s not cheap. I can’t say what’s happening in America today is any worse than what’s been happening at any other time. I think now is the time that people are starting to see they can live somewhere else.”

Source: Al Jazeera

@LeNoraMillen      01-18-18

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Lifestyle

Is ‘Botched Marketing’ dooming Taraji Henson’s ‘Proud Mary’

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By Cedric Nettles Entertainment Editor

Ok, straight up, all seriousness, and no disrespect to Sony and Queen Henson, but when I first saw the commericial for Proud Mary I felt like something is missing. It was like Henson was being introduced for a made for television type movie. It just felt odd and lack of a better term vague. I saw that a couple of days ago, then the below excerpt really shed light on what I may have been subconsciously thinking.

 

The (long) weekend box office numbers are in, and Proud Mary, starring Taraji P. Henson, opened at No. 8, earning $12 million in the four days following its release. The low box office numbers confirm concerns over the last week that the studio, Screen Gems, wasn’t doing enough promotion to set the film up for a successful opening weekend.-Buzz Feed News

Granted I did not see this trailer first, but the commercial just had a television type feel, call me crazy. Here is the trailer, which looks amazing.

 

 

There simply was no build up, no heat, no anticipation factor, and that is truly unfortunate.As movie goers we see when the actor does not live up to the billing. In Henson’s case, I think the movie promotion did not live up to her billing. At her level …Errr…There has to be marketing.

We should not fret not. Henson cashed this check, and will cash a few more as her resume and trophy shelf grows.

Buzz Feed News article

 

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